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British Academy Lectures, 2015-16$
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Janet Carsten and Simon Frith

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266045

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266045.001.0001

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Social class mobility in modern Britain: changing structure, constant process

Social class mobility in modern Britain: changing structure, constant process

Lecture in Sociology read 15 March 2016

Chapter:
(p.89) Social class mobility in modern Britain: changing structure, constant process
Source:
British Academy Lectures, 2015-16
Author(s):

John H. Goldthorpe

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266045.003.0005

The class structure provides an important context for the study of social mobility. The evolution of the class structure is the all-important factor determining individuals’ changing experience of mobility, as expressed in absolute rates. The total mobility rate shows long-term stability; but, because of structural change, trends of rising upward and falling downward mobility in the mid-20th century are now being reversed. Relative mobility rates, comparing the chances of individuals of different class origins arriving at different class destinations, also show long-term stability. All this is evident over a period of more or less continuous educational expansion and reform—thus calling into question the belief that educational policy is key to promoting mobility. Education is best considered as a ‘positional’ good; and the motivation, and capacity, of parents in more advantaged class positions to help their children maintain their competitive edge in the educational system, and in turn in labour markets, underlies the resistance to change that the mobility regime displays.

Keywords:   social mobility, class structure, education, cohort studies

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